Best Multiplayer Flash Games Worth Playing


multiplayer flash games

Some think that flash games are a waste of time. But, why not waste your spare time in getting some thrill playing these games rather than sitting idle? Here are some of the best multiplayer flash games to play.

Alien Hominid

A close up of a computer keyboard

Starting things off is one of the quintessential flash games, Alien Hominid. This run and gun shooter originally came to Newgrounds in 2002 and exploded in popularity shortly thereafter. Its developer, The Behemoth, went on to create the beloved Castle Crashers, which garnered great success as well, but Alien Hominid is how the studio got its start.As for the game itself, it’s got a super-stylized art style, with thick outlines and huge, flat colors. It plays a lot like Metal Slug, wherein you must run left to right while taking out enemies with your blaster. You play as one of the little yellow aliens (shown above) in either single-player or cooperative multiplayer modes. Whichever mode you pick, there are a lot of secret agents to defeat, along with a slew of power-ups to collect. You’ve probably at least seen or heard of this game before — and for good reason. It’s one of the most popular flash games of all time.

Line Rider

A young boy using a laptop computer sitting on top of a table

Ah, good old Line Rider. Does anyone else have memories of booting this up at school in the computer lab? It’s a classic, for sure, but what makes it so special? Well, the main thing is that it’s so simple, and it leans into something that will probably always be funny: Slapstick comedy. Creating a huge, complicated track that sends your character flopping across it is still funny, and the tools used to create such tracks are easy and intuitive to use.

Line Rider came to browsers in 2006 and became a meme (before memes were even popularized), thanks to the wacky creations people would share around the internet. There were creation games that were far more complex than this at the time, but Line Rider garnered success due to its simplicity, which has stood the test of time, even 14 years later.

Jacksmith

First impressions can be deceiving and Jacksmith is a prime example. The game’s initial premise seems fairly simple, requiring players to take on the role of a small-town blacksmith hellbent on arming his band of pig warriors with the finest weapons ever assembled. Once the weapons are crafted using a process of click-reliant minigames such as pouring bronze, hammering edges, and constructing hilts, players can then oversee several combatants in the field as they collect blueprints, gems, and other resources enemies drop to build more refined weapons.

Although battles automatically play out, weapon duration and battle success depend on how well you perform in minigames. This becomes increasingly hard as you receive larger weapon orders and less time. Jacksmith does become rather repetitive at times, but you’ll begin to find a certain satisfaction in constructing well-built instruments of war, mowing down legions of bats, slugs, and otherworldly miscreants on your path to defeating the diabolical, Great Wizard Dudley.

Doom

The most well-known game on this list, 1993’s Doom is a seminal game in the first-person shooter genre. Developed by id Software and initially shipped via mail order and the early days of shareware, you play as Doomguy, an unnamed space marine that fights his way through nine levels filled with monsters and demons.

Today, Doom may not look so hot, but it’s an interesting game to revisit due to its enormous impact on the industry. It’s also still quite fun, a testament to how well-made it was in 1993. You can find Doom on many different sites on the web, but our favorite method is through Kongregate, the popular online games client once owned by GameStop.

Do play any of these games or all of them in your spare time.

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